2018 Gardens of Fairview Tour

 

2018 GARDENS OF FAIRVIEW TOUR:  June 9
There are nine self-guided, highly diverse gardens on the tour this year — four of them new. Pick and choose or start early and visit them all!

 

Tickets Available at these locations in Fairview:

For tickets buy directly in Fairview at
The Garden Spot
Trout Lily Market
The Hub of Fairview
Hickory Nut Gap Farm
Troyer Amish Store
Turgua Farmstead Brewery
Farmer Greg’s Produce

SEE MAPS HERE

The Ramsey’s Gardens
15 Ivy Cove Road, just off Old Fort Road
Excited to have Mary Alice and Terry Ramsey back for a third year! What a wonderful garden and home place. Do not miss it this year or go again. There is always something new to learn. Gardens, flowers, greenhouse and a 2- story tree house. There’s also a ram pump for water supply, art, antiques and a 1st place, prize-winning Habitat for Humanity ReStore garden shed. Last year their garden site was in in Southern Living. A wonderful tribute for a diversified expression of love for gardening and art.

Lick Log Branch Apiaries (new)
111 Log Gap Road (Old Fort Road off 74A about 3.7 miles, go left onto Log Gap Road (gravel) a bit more than 1/2 a mile and look for signs.)
Ricky Manning has been keeping honeybees for 10 years and is now studying and growing mountain pollinator plants for butterflies and bees. He is adding local woodland medicinal plants to his list this year and working closely with WNC Medicinal Herb Growers, a group organized by NC Extension Service. He will show you around his hives and his garden, as well as talk about the mountain plants he works with. He is hopeful that he will have some plants for sale and possibly some honey.

Sweet Farm (new)
40 Blue Ridge Development Road (Just
off Old Fort Road near Spring Mountain
Community Center)
New to Fairview, but not to WNC or organic gardening, Molly and Robear bought 3 acres along Cane Creek to homestead. In just a few months,
they have amassed over 500 shiitake mushroom logs on site. Robear has been producing shiitakes for fine dining restaurants in Asheville for over
10 years. He is also breeding black soldier fly larvae as a healthy protein source for their chickens. Molly’s had 25 years in the retail garden, nursery
and landscape business in the Washington, DC area. Organic garden beds are taking shape for flowers, herbs and vegetables with a focus on sought-after varieties not normally available through local farmers. This farm is in the works and off to a great start. They both have lots of experience to share. They will have mushrooms, black soldier fly larvae and chicken eggs raised on organic feed available for sale.

Fruit of the Fire Glass Blowing Studio & Blue Ridge Mountain Creamery  (new)
327 Flat Creek Road (at the end of Old Fort Road, take a right onto Flat Creek Road and go a bit more than 1-1/2 a miles)
Victor Chiarizia has been  in Fairview for 13 years. For the past 8 years, he has been making artisan cow milk cheeses, aged in an underground cave on his property. A person of many talents, he is also a sculptural glassblower. He will have tours of both operations plus his garden, ponds and flowing water landscape. He can be found every Saturday at the Downtown Market on Market Street and will be selling his cheeses on the day of the tour. His glass garden art is available at the The Garden Spot on Highway 74A.

Little Jaybird Farm
400 Flat Creek Road (About 1/4 mile past Garden #4 on Flat Creek Road)
Walker and Mandy Overstreet started their small farm since moving to Fairview in 2014. Little Jaybird Farm was named after their 3-year-old son, who at any given time may be found running around the farm with little-to-no clothes on. They focus on raising heritage breed animals including hogs, rabbits and chickens and sell farm fresh eggs at The Hub of Fairview and hatch out the rest to add back to their flock. Little Jaybird uses raised-bed gardens onsite where they practice organic gardening using composted manure from their animals to fertilize the plants. They compost all food scraps possible and the rest go to a black soldier flytrap that eventually creates organic feed for the chickens. They also entered into beekeeping and mushroom growing this spring. The farm has a large focus on sustainable agriculture and raising their children to understand where their food comes from. They will have eggs for sale and composted manure, manure tea kits, and Mandy’s hand-crafted gardening products including poison ivy salve, sore muscle salve, soaps and  more.

Edible Forest Homestead (new)
19 Reed Road (Do not use GPS for this site — continue on Flat Creek Road onto Morgan Hill Road, 1.6 miles, go right on Marlowe Road and go across the bridge. Follow the signs.)
Enjoy the drive to the homestead of Jennifer and Yossi Betesh. After living overseas for 20 years, they returned to find a piece of land to grow their own organic food. They have experience in natural health and healing and farm to  table cooking. As self-professed amateur gardeners/homesteaders, Jennifer feels the only way to learn is to get started. In two years, they have created 15 raised beds for vegetable and herbs, planted fruit trees, berries, grapes and many pollinator plants. This winter they laid out a mushroom trail along their creek and continue to add diversity to create their Edible Forest garden. Learn how they got started, how they deal with issues of flooding (that happened this winter), and how they grow with the natural surroundings. They have a lot to offer those who are starting out. They will have baked goods, bottled water and possibly some garden goods for sale.

The Schumacher Homestead (New)
768 Garren Creek Road (3-1/2 off 74A or 3.8 miles from Morgan Hill Drive from Garden #6)
I went to visit Richard and Rebecca’s place to see how they addressed water runoff on his property. As I climbed up the driveway, I began to understand the challenges he had — not an unusual problem here in our mountains. He wrote: “Mountainside living and rain require creativity in preventing soil erosion. This is especially true if your property is near the bottom of a drainage area which feeds a creek or stream.” He has utilized a variety of methods to lower erosion and sedimentation including retaining walls, a culvert system that directs   water to catchment ponds (full of fish and frogs), driveway drains and landscape plantings. They are always learning more and making adjustments accordingly. They also have a very nice garden and some pasture land where, when I arrived, two female wild turkeys were feeding.

The Patchwork Underground
578 Garren Creek Road (2.5 miles off 74A or right on Garren Creek for a mile from Garden #7)
What a diverse place Adam and Alyssa Sacora’s homestead is with a greenhouse for starting seeds, year-round food production and garden beds for vegetables and medicinal herbs. Their place abounds with fruit trees, berries, honeybees and a living willow dome. Alyssa grows plants for weaving baskets, natural dyeing and handmade paper. Adam designs and maintains their solar energy systems: solar thermal for hot water and space heating, and photovoltaic for electricity (newly installed this winter). This is a diverse property that is productive with overflowing artistic passion. They will share their experiences and lessons learned. Hand-bound journals and paper goods will be for sale.

The Forest Garden
339 Sugar Hollow Road (off 74A near Hickory Nut Gap Farm or from Garden #8, continue on Garren Creek a 1/2 mile and make a sharp left onto Hollywood Road at Pleasant Grove Baptist Church. In 1-1/2 miles, go left up Sugar Hollow Road)
Gary and Barbara Swinea’s place is a wonderful example of what you can do with a wooded home site. Gary has used rocks from the property to make beds and line paths through the woods that are full of local plant species and trees. He has a large collection of hydrangeas, herbs and flowers that wind you through a stream area and around the property. His vegetable garden is on a slope and is watered by redirecting his air conditioner condensation. He takes great pride in his work, minimizing changes to the lay of the land to prevent erosion and using the natural slope for production and plantings. This is a favorite of all of our past tours! Come take a walk with Gary.

TICKETS
• $15 per person – children under 15 free
JUNE 9, 2018 Tour Date

Tickets available at:
• Trout Lily Market 628-0402
• The Garden Spot 691-0164
• The Hub of Fairview 628-1422

PAYMENT IN CASH OR CHECK ONLY (payable to Gardens of Fairview)

TOURS RUN RAIN OR SHINE!
Please carpool when you can. No dogs please. Bathrooms available at Spring Mountain Community Center only. Attendees will be asked to sign a release waiver at each garden.

QUESTIONS?
Visit GardensofFairview.com or call Jim at 864.313.5106

 

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!

A self service farm stand from his organic far
Local meats, deli, eggs, chickens, tours, events
Your local garden center for all your plant needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hub of Fairview
Local products, gifts, crafts, fart, workshops, gift baskets

 

 

 

 

 

One of a kind market and deli using local products

 

 

 

 

 

Amish products, deli, farmstead and wedding venue

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unique farmstead brewery, now with Cider and Kambuchi

About Jim Smith

Jim started landscaping in 1978 and has been gardening since…well in fourth grade.  He opened an organic garden center at the WNC Farmers Market on Brevard Rd in 1985 until 2000.  From there he sold plants, books, tools and organic fertilizers.  It was also place where he imported organic ginger to US from Costa Rica…a project he developed with local farmers there, and ran for 13 years.

Jim is one of the founders of the Organic Growers School and served on board for 8 years.  He was also was a part of CFSA and on their board for two years. Jim planned their conference for three years; a multi state organization working with others to promote Sustainable Agriculture.

Jim farmed for 8 years in upstate SC where he marketed produce at SC State Market in Greenville, SC.  He had two greenhouses and about four acres under crop production.

Jim has consulted with Furman University, worked with NC state and Clemson on various boards and projects.  

His work internationally has taken him to projects in Zambia, Africa, Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile, Guatemala, Cuba Dominica, Jamaica and many years in Costa Rica.

Jim represented North Carolina on a Sustainable Research and Education, USDA project that worked to promote Sustainable Agriculture throughout the Southeast.

 

Consulting Services

 

Jim learned many things that expanded his knowledge, and  along with his years of work as a farmer, landscaper, educator, he realized that it would be good to offer services that can enhance your property, be it land, home, farm.

Services include many options:

Use of Woodlands, from tree health to creating more edible options like mushrooms, native fruits and edible plants in and along the edges and identifying what plants, wildflowers, and those opportunistic plants now showing up on our land.  We understand there are some very beneficial reasons these opportunistic plants are showing up. We identify ways, if needed, to control them without chemicals.

Jim can help you plan and use a small scale greenhouse, as well as cold frames for seedlings, and winter production of food.

He can show you how to build your soil, plan and plant your garden  creating nutrient dense food gardens. Also, how to set up an orchard or small fruit areas, as well as adding more wildflowers and herbs. All this using only organic and natural processes.

He will show you how you can use water on your property by containing all that comes off slopes, buildings, sheds, etc: and from this, use it to water your plantings.

Learn to compost your food and plant waste  in ways suitable to your land. Composting is a way to build your soils, feed your plants and save on buying outside amendments,

All methods are to create a wholeness, a system for using your land and the resources you have available. The goal is to create a healthy place for you to live and provide you with beauty, food, and forest.

Jim can also help with aspects of organic farming; from soil evaluation and fertility issues to use of cover crops systems, to greenhouse use and more.

If you have more questions, or want more information please contact Jim @ 864 313-5106

Consulting Fees

Consulting service is on fee bases, with first priority being an evaluation of your site.  Once that is done, all parties can plan for what directions you may want to move forward.

Fees are $225 minimum for up to first two hours , and $75/hr afterwards. If travel to your property is over 15 miles both ways there will be an additional fee of $.55 a mile from time I leave my office…that is not included in the two hour fee. Longer term projects are negotiable. Most evaluations can be accomplished in two hours (depending on size of property, etc).  Once property and scope of the plan is determined, you will receive a write up following visit with ideas and connections as needed.

Ten (10%) of fees will go to Gardens of Fairview Tour for next year’s Tour.  Another 10% will go to Food For Fairview, a non-profit serving local residents food needs.

2018 Gardens of Fairview Tour

 

2018 GARDENS OF FAIRVIEW TOUR:  June 9
There are nine self-guided, highly diverse gardens on the tour this year — four of them new. Pick and choose or start early and visit them all!

 

Tickets Available at these locations in Fairview:

For tickets buy directly in Fairview at
The Garden Spot
Trout Lily Market
The Hub of Fairview
Hickory Nut Gap Farm
Troyer Amish Store
Turgua Farmstead Brewery
Farmer Greg’s Produce

SEE MAPS HERE

The Ramsey’s Gardens
15 Ivy Cove Road, just off Old Fort Road
Excited to have Mary Alice and Terry Ramsey back for a third year! What a wonderful garden and home place. Do not miss it this year or go again. There is always something new to learn. Gardens, flowers, greenhouse and a 2- story tree house. There’s also a ram pump for water supply, art, antiques and a 1st place, prize-winning Habitat for Humanity ReStore garden shed. Last year their garden site was in in Southern Living. A wonderful tribute for a diversified expression of love for gardening and art.

Lick Log Branch Apiaries (new)
111 Log Gap Road (Old Fort Road off 74A about 3.7 miles, go left onto Log Gap Road (gravel) a bit more than 1/2 a mile and look for signs.)
Ricky Manning has been keeping honeybees for 10 years and is now studying and growing mountain pollinator plants for butterflies and bees. He is adding local woodland medicinal plants to his list this year and working closely with WNC Medicinal Herb Growers, a group organized by NC Extension Service. He will show you around his hives and his garden, as well as talk about the mountain plants he works with. He is hopeful that he will have some plants for sale and possibly some honey.

Sweet Farm (new)
40 Blue Ridge Development Road (Just
off Old Fort Road near Spring Mountain
Community Center)
New to Fairview, but not to WNC or organic gardening, Molly and Robear bought 3 acres along Cane Creek to homestead. In just a few months,
they have amassed over 500 shiitake mushroom logs on site. Robear has been producing shiitakes for fine dining restaurants in Asheville for over
10 years. He is also breeding black soldier fly larvae as a healthy protein source for their chickens. Molly’s had 25 years in the retail garden, nursery
and landscape business in the Washington, DC area. Organic garden beds are taking shape for flowers, herbs and vegetables with a focus on sought-after varieties not normally available through local farmers. This farm is in the works and off to a great start. They both have lots of experience to share. They will have mushrooms, black soldier fly larvae and chicken eggs raised on organic feed available for sale.

Fruit of the Fire Glass Blowing Studio & Blue Ridge Mountain Creamery  (new)
327 Flat Creek Road (at the end of Old Fort Road, take a right onto Flat Creek Road and go a bit more than 1-1/2 a miles)
Victor Chiarizia has been  in Fairview for 13 years. For the past 8 years, he has been making artisan cow milk cheeses, aged in an underground cave on his property. A person of many talents, he is also a sculptural glassblower. He will have tours of both operations plus his garden, ponds and flowing water landscape. He can be found every Saturday at the Downtown Market on Market Street and will be selling his cheeses on the day of the tour. His glass garden art is available at the The Garden Spot on Highway 74A.

Little Jaybird Farm
400 Flat Creek Road (About 1/4 mile past Garden #4 on Flat Creek Road)
Walker and Mandy Overstreet started their small farm since moving to Fairview in 2014. Little Jaybird Farm was named after their 3-year-old son, who at any given time may be found running around the farm with little-to-no clothes on. They focus on raising heritage breed animals including hogs, rabbits and chickens and sell farm fresh eggs at The Hub of Fairview and hatch out the rest to add back to their flock. Little Jaybird uses raised-bed gardens onsite where they practice organic gardening using composted manure from their animals to fertilize the plants. They compost all food scraps possible and the rest go to a black soldier flytrap that eventually creates organic feed for the chickens. They also entered into beekeeping and mushroom growing this spring. The farm has a large focus on sustainable agriculture and raising their children to understand where their food comes from. They will have eggs for sale and composted manure, manure tea kits, and Mandy’s hand-crafted gardening products including poison ivy salve, sore muscle salve, soaps and  more.

Edible Forest Homestead (new)
19 Reed Road (Do not use GPS for this site — continue on Flat Creek Road onto Morgan Hill Road, 1.6 miles, go right on Marlowe Road and go across the bridge. Follow the signs.)
Enjoy the drive to the homestead of Jennifer and Yossi Betesh. After living overseas for 20 years, they returned to find a piece of land to grow their own organic food. They have experience in natural health and healing and farm to  table cooking. As self-professed amateur gardeners/homesteaders, Jennifer feels the only way to learn is to get started. In two years, they have created 15 raised beds for vegetable and herbs, planted fruit trees, berries, grapes and many pollinator plants. This winter they laid out a mushroom trail along their creek and continue to add diversity to create their Edible Forest garden. Learn how they got started, how they deal with issues of flooding (that happened this winter), and how they grow with the natural surroundings. They have a lot to offer those who are starting out. They will have baked goods, bottled water and possibly some garden goods for sale.

The Schumacher Homestead (New)
768 Garren Creek Road (3-1/2 off 74A or 3.8 miles from Morgan Hill Drive from Garden #6)
I went to visit Richard and Rebecca’s place to see how they addressed water runoff on his property. As I climbed up the driveway, I began to understand the challenges he had — not an unusual problem here in our mountains. He wrote: “Mountainside living and rain require creativity in preventing soil erosion. This is especially true if your property is near the bottom of a drainage area which feeds a creek or stream.” He has utilized a variety of methods to lower erosion and sedimentation including retaining walls, a culvert system that directs   water to catchment ponds (full of fish and frogs), driveway drains and landscape plantings. They are always learning more and making adjustments accordingly. They also have a very nice garden and some pasture land where, when I arrived, two female wild turkeys were feeding.

The Patchwork Underground
578 Garren Creek Road (2.5 miles off 74A or right on Garren Creek for a mile from Garden #7)
What a diverse place Adam and Alyssa Sacora’s homestead is with a greenhouse for starting seeds, year-round food production and garden beds for vegetables and medicinal herbs. Their place abounds with fruit trees, berries, honeybees and a living willow dome. Alyssa grows plants for weaving baskets, natural dyeing and handmade paper. Adam designs and maintains their solar energy systems: solar thermal for hot water and space heating, and photovoltaic for electricity (newly installed this winter). This is a diverse property that is productive with overflowing artistic passion. They will share their experiences and lessons learned. Hand-bound journals and paper goods will be for sale.

The Forest Garden
339 Sugar Hollow Road (off 74A near Hickory Nut Gap Farm or from Garden #8, continue on Garren Creek a 1/2 mile and make a sharp left onto Hollywood Road at Pleasant Grove Baptist Church. In 1-1/2 miles, go left up Sugar Hollow Road)
Gary and Barbara Swinea’s place is a wonderful example of what you can do with a wooded home site. Gary has used rocks from the property to make beds and line paths through the woods that are full of local plant species and trees. He has a large collection of hydrangeas, herbs and flowers that wind you through a stream area and around the property. His vegetable garden is on a slope and is watered by redirecting his air conditioner condensation. He takes great pride in his work, minimizing changes to the lay of the land to prevent erosion and using the natural slope for production and plantings. This is a favorite of all of our past tours! Come take a walk with Gary.

TICKETS
• $15 per person – children under 15 free
JUNE 9, 2018 Tour Date

Tickets available at:
• Trout Lily Market 628-0402
• The Garden Spot 691-0164
• The Hub of Fairview 628-1422

PAYMENT IN CASH OR CHECK ONLY (payable to Gardens of Fairview)

TOURS RUN RAIN OR SHINE!
Please carpool when you can. No dogs please. Bathrooms available at Spring Mountain Community Center only. Attendees will be asked to sign a release waiver at each garden.

QUESTIONS?
Visit GardensofFairview.com or call Jim at 864.313.5106

 

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!

A self service farm stand from his organic far
Local meats, deli, eggs, chickens, tours, events
Your local garden center for all your plant needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hub of Fairview
Local products, gifts, crafts, fart, workshops, gift baskets

 

 

 

 

 

One of a kind market and deli using local products

 

 

 

 

 

Amish products, deli, farmstead and wedding venue

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unique farmstead brewery, now with Cider and Kambuchi